Posts Tagged ‘training’

As Mark Rippetoe points out in this T-Nation article, there is a big difference between Training and Exercising.  In a nutshell,  Training is the process of following a progressive program that is designed to increase an aspect of fitness over time. The aspect of fitness most often associated with training is strength, but people can train to improve power, speed, and endurance as well. In contrast, Exercising is what happens if your workouts don’t progress over time, or if you do randomized workouts with no attention paid to progression of key exercises, If your program isn’t planned with an emphasis on progression, you’re not Training. You’re Exercising. And you need to stop, because Exercising is bullshit.

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As a catcher, your primary job is to catch the ball when it is thrown to you. Your job doesn’t stop with just catching the ball, though. All catchers should be able to effectively frame pitches, which consists of catching the ball in a way that makes pitches look good to the umpire. In order to frame pitches well, you need to possess strong forearms and wrists capable of stopping the ball’s momentum and making the glove go where you want it to.

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http://www.stack.com/2013/07/14/in-season-baseball-workout-tips/

deadlift

If you train with me, or you are a regular visitor to this site, you already know that I talk a lot about the importance of hip extension during sprinting. Powerful extension of the hip is what propels runners forward, so my athletes spend a lot of time developing their glutes, which control hip extension. However, one important aspect of our training that I haven’t talked much about yet is hamstring strength. If your hamstring strength isn’t up to snuff, all the glute strength in the world won’t help you run fast.

When sprinting, your goal should be to put as much force into the ground as possible to move forward as quickly as possible. This action is driven by hip extension, but in order for the force generated by the hip to reach the ground, it needs to travel through the hamstrings first. This means that in order to run fast, sprinters need to have strong hamstrings that are capable of absorbing and transmitting huge amounts of force effectively and without injury.

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One of the biggest gripes I had while playing baseball in college was that our in-season training program was trash. By the time May rolled around everybody was skinny, weak, and threw a good 4-5 mph slower than at the beginning of the season. I noticed this during high school ball too, but I didn’t understand why it was happening. I figured that if you trained all offseason, that strength would just stay with you during the season. But unfortunately, that’s not how it works.

Once I got to college and started learning about the body and training, I realized that improper training methods during the season were what was causing this steady decline in performance over the course of the year. That, combined with a hefty dose of long-distance “conditioning” runs.

Here’s 3 big mistakes that people often make when training in season. I’ve omitted “Doing Nothing” because frankly, that should be common knowledge by now.

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Check out my latest article on Stack.com, “3 Medicine Ball Drills to Develop Velocity”

Miguel-Cabrera-Med-Ball-Throw—STACK

If you’re a human and you’re alive in the 21st century, odds are good that you have pretty terrible posture. Years upon years of sitting, slumped over a desk, have  rounded your shoulders and turned your upper back into a kyphotic nightmare. If you’re a baseball, softball, tennis, or volleyball player, the effects are probably even more pronounced.

Look at the average human these days and this is what you’ll see:

shoulder slump

Head forward, shoulders forward, and hunched spine. None of these are good traits. How does this happen?

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